Aboriginal Environmental Stewardship Diploma

The Aboriginal Environmental Stewardship Diploma (AESD) offers a post-secondary education program that provides the core principles of environmental science, stewardship and indigenous environmental justice. The program is designed to offer students an Indigenous community-focused perspective on environmental issues within Manitoba. The objective will be to integrate global and regional environmental issues related to the ecological, and cultural impacts as well as legal implications of resource use and exploration in the 21st century. The curriculum will focus on the incorporation of Indigenous Knowledge within a scientific framework.

Program Overview

The program consists of 60 degree credit hours distributed between core and elective courses:

  • Core courses: 30 credit hours – these course will provide the academic foundations of the program.
  • Elective courses: 28.5 selected credit hours (out of 45 credit hours from a list of approved courses). These elective course will be selected to reflect community specific environmental issues/concerns.
  • Work experience/training: 1.5 credit hours
  • On campus offer only (University of Manitoba, Fort Garry Campus)

Credits received in the AESD program may be transferred into the Clayton H. Riddell Faculty of Environment, Earth, and Resources at the University of Manitoba.

Core Courses

The following are a list of the core courses in the program:

  • ARTS 1110 – Introduction to University
  • ENVR 1000 – Environmental Science 1 – Concepts
  • ENVR 2000 – Environmental Science 2 – Issues
  • ENVR 3160 – Environmental Responsibilities and Law
  • ENVR 3250 – Environmental Assessment
  • GEOG 4260 – Sacred Lands and Sacred Spaces of Indigenous Peoples
  • NATV 1220 – The Native Peoples of Canada, Part I
  • NATV 1240 – The Native Peoples of Canada, Part 2
  • NATV 2100 – Aboriginal Spirituality
  • NATV 3310 – Canadian Law and Aboriginal People

Course Descriptions

ARTS 1110 – Introduction to University
A seminar course designed to help students make the transition to university by imparting the knowledge, skills, and attitudes requisite for success in university study (3 Credit hours).

ENVR 1000 – Environmental Science 1 – Concepts
This course will introduce students to the conceptual framework of the environment by examining its physical, biological, and social components. General topics to be considered will include ecological principles and the responses of natural and managed systems to disturbance; population growth; biodiversity and conservation; and environmental sustainability (3 Credit hours).

ENVR 2000 – Environmental Science 2 – Issues
This course will briefly review the major features of the structure and function of natural systems along with the degree to which these have been compromised. The main component of the course, however, will concentrate on the identification of the issues that underlie environmental degradation, while exploring alternative conditions that have the potential to reverse current trends and ultimately contribute to ecological sustainability. Prerequisite: ENVR 1000 (C). (3 Credit hours).

ENVR 3160 – Environmental Responsibilities and Law
Environmental responsibilities and their legal framework in terms of policies, legislation, standards and guidelines and the tools to manage responsibility are examined through lectures, case study review and discussion. Environmental liability and due diligence are reviewed in relation to responsibilities of organizations and individuals. Strategies to manage environmental liabilities, including environmental and risk assessment, are also discussed. Prerequisite: a minimum grade of C in ENVR 2000, or permission of department head. (3 Credit hours).

ENVR 3250 – Environmental Assessment (Lab Required)
The theory, principles and practices of environmental assessment as a planning and decision-making process to identify and mitigate adverse effects of development projects. Environmental assessment is defined in the context of federal and provincial legislation, and applicable standards and guidelines. Laboratory assignments involve practical experiences, case study review and basic report preparation. Prerequisites: [ENVR 3160 (C)], or permission of department head. (3 Credit hours).

GEOG 4260 – Sacred Lands and Sacred Spaces of Indigenous Peoples
Students will increase their understanding of the importance and significance of Sacred Lands and Sacred Spaces to International Indigenous Peoples. Experiential learning, seminars, and a field component may be included. (3 Credit hours).

NATV 1220 – The Native Peoples of Canada, Part I
A survey of the political, social, and economic situations of the contemporary First Nations, Métis, and Inuit Peoples of Canada from pre- contact to 1945. (3 Credit hours).

NATV 1240 – The Native Peoples of Canada, Part 2
A survey of the political, social, and economic situations of the contemporary First Nations, Métis, and Inuit Peoples of Canada from 1945 to the present. This course may include a field trip component. (3 Credit hours).

NATV 2100 – Aboriginal Spirituality
This course allows students to work with Aboriginal elders or traditional teachers, exposing them to cultural and spiritual concepts. Emphasis is on Anishinabe or Cree teachings, though other First Nations approaches may be offered. This course may include a field trip component. (3 Credit hours).

NATV 3310 – Canadian Law and Aboriginal People
A survey of laws relating to Native peoples in Canada. Topics will include legal aspects of aboriginal title, Indian treaties, Indian and Métis land claims, the Indian Act, hunting and fishing rights, self-government, and constitutional issues. Prerequisite: [a grade of “C” or better in both NATV 1220 and NATV 1240] or written consent of department head. (3 Credit hours).

Contacts

Aboriginal Focus Programs
Room 221 – 114 Sidney Smith Street, Migizii Agamik
University of Manitoba
Winnipeg, MB. Canada R3T 2N2
Phone: 204-272-1696
Toll free in Manitoba: 1-888-216-7011 ext. 1696
Fax: 204-275-6489 Email: enviromentalstewardship.AFP@umanitoba.ca

“Within the Boreal shield ecozone of Manitoba approximately 92% of the Indigenous communities are affected by the ecological, economic and cultural impacts of renewable and non-renewable resource exploration and development.”

With the ever growing demand for natural resources Indigenous perspectives and self representation related to the discourse on energy, land use and economic development will be critical.”

The aim of AESD program will be to provide communities an opportunity to educate and train students in the fields of environmental science and Indigenous environmental stewardship and law.”

Dr. Rod Lastra

Program Director